4 Tips to Increase Editorial Coverage of Your Products on Dering Hall

 
 
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Dering Hall features the incredible work of our members in our editorial section, which is called The Journal. We write articles, including house tours, product round-ups, event coverage and more, that showcase the beautiful projects and products of our designer talents. We aim to include as many members as possible in these features. Below are 4 tips to help you better connect your products with our editors.

1. Respond to the Editorial Calendar

Our customer service team sends out an editorial calendar listing the upcoming articles our editors are working on. We strongly encourage you to submit any products you have that fit with the upcoming topics. When the edit team is creating product round-ups and other articles, the submissions list is one of the first places they go to source content.

2. Tag Your Products Correctly

To ensure that your products can be easily found, make sure that products are tagged correctly. Incorrectly tagging products means that they may be missed when the editorial team is sourcing for stories. Please do not over-tag products in an effort to increase the places they appear. This is frustrating to editors and users alike.

3. Tell Us About New Products

We want to tell our readers and visitors about your new products. Whether you are introducing one new piece to market or launching a whole new line, let us help you market these new items. To start, tell your account manager about any new pieces and upload them to your storefront. This will help us strategize the best way to promote the items and ensure that your profile stays fresh and up-to-date.

4. Upload the Best Quality Imagery

If possible, use professionally shot photos for your profile. Even lighting is important as well, so that users don’t confuse shadows for different colors on the product. Try to shoot against a white background, especially since primary product images will be silhouetted against white. A good example is a glass or lucite product—if it’s shot against a colored background, when silhouetted, the product would appear to be that color. Remember, since this is a website, the photo of the product is the product, in a way!

 
Erin Gilbert